MINIATURES


STATEMENT


Our memory stores the emotions and dreams that become the building bricks of our work. They are the essence of what surrounds us, an understanding of the universal rhythms of nature: a tree, a rock, a splash of paint, a procession of ants - they follow the rules of gravity, dynamics, attraction, repulsion - we create images that represent a more intimate way to look at reality - if we follow the universal laws that drive planets, emotions, visions, remembrances reassembled in different ways guided by associations caused by our inner self, different from the original building stone, but intimately connected to them.

read more...

Our memory stores the emotions and dreams that become the building bricks of our work. They are the essence of what surrounds us, an understanding of the universal rhythms of nature: a tree, a rock, a splash of paint, a procession of ants - they follow the rules of gravity, dynamics, attraction, repulsion - we create images that represent a more intimate way to look at reality - if we follow the universal laws that drive planets, emotions, visions, remembrances reassembled in different ways guided by associations caused by our inner self, different from the original building stone, but intimately connected to them.

less...

ARTWORKS


In his Miniature paintings Vanni uses extremely small brushstrokes, characteristics of tempera technique, as a sort of writing of the painted surface. Any trace of the real scale of the material and forms is eliminated. As the 14th century Italian miniature painters, he establishes an intimist relationship with the painted work with a consequent loss of awareness of the surrounding world.

The use of gold leaf emerges from Vanni’s observations on the gold grounds of the Sienese School, where the gold leaf, here and there eroded, reveals the underlying red earth ground. This evokes the idea of the archeological find, where decay and preciosity coexist.

read more...

In his Miniature paintings Vanni uses extremely small brushstrokes, characteristics of tempera technique, as a sort of writing of the painted surface. Any trace of the real scale of the material and forms is eliminated. As the 14th century Italian miniature painters, he establishes an intimist relationship with the painted work with a consequent loss of awareness of the surrounding world.

The use of gold leaf emerges from Vanni’s observations on the gold grounds of the Sienese School, where the gold leaf, here and there eroded, reveals the underlying red earth ground. This evokes the idea of the archeological find, where decay and preciosity coexist. The red base, that is scraped and ruined, enters into competition with the gold for its chromatic intensity. The relationship creates an interesting color interaction, taking advantage of the reflective qualities of the metal, depending on the incidence of light. This effect is broadly used in Byzantine icons, where the portion covered with gold is the first form that one sees in the darkness of a church, to then recede into the background in relationship to the painted figures, when the angle of the light changes.

In these precious small works Vanni reveals the appeal that the timeless quality of Byzantine painting has always held for him. Any spatial or temporal indication is omitted. Backgrounds of colors consumed by abrasions suspend in space forms that are treated like draperies, expressing a co-mingling of elegance and solemnity.

less...

LIFE


Gian Berto Vanni was born in Rome. He studied with Vordemberge-Gildewart in Holland and color theory with Joseph Albers at Yale University in New Haven. He has been actively involved in the Italian Art scene of the 60s, moving to New York City at the end of the 70s. He has been teaching color theory at Cooper Union for 30 years.

read more...

Gian Berto Vanni was born in Rome. He studied with Vordemberge-Gildewart in Holland and color theory with Joseph Albers at Yale University in New Haven. He has been actively involved in the Italian Art scene of the 60s, moving to New York City at the end of the 70s. He has been teaching color theory at Cooper Union for 30 years.

He currently lives and works in New York and Greece. His works have been shown in galleries in the United States, Europe and Japan.

less...